I imagine it would’ve been very easy for something this small to get inconsistent treatment, so whoever wanted the “The” added was clearly very detail-oriented. In both versions of the game you have to name yourself, and that name is attached to the selected save file. This added “the” was also included on the NES version’s box, cartridge, manual, and all that too, so at some point someone on the localization team said, “Hey, make extra sure to include ‘The’ in everything!”. The Famicom Disk System is different though – it has a whole bunch of stuff that displays before the game loads. That’s yet another mystery. This guide is intended to be thorough and comprehensive as I can make it. But it’s very useful in the second quest, since you get the flute in Level 2. Nevertheless, even if you just want the main items and complete each dungeon, this guide should still be of use to you too. In comparison, a Nazi swastika faces the other direction: I’m actually surprised Nintendo’s localization team wasn’t worried about backlash from parents who didn’t know any better. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Here’s the screen when you’re walking around outside: And here’s the screen for when you’re in a dungeon: Incidentally, where it says “Use B Button for this” in the NES version, it says, “Treasure that can be used with the B Button” in the Japanese version. It’s strange, as some of the text in the game is handled superbly, but some of it, like this, makes you wonder how anyone approved it for English-speaking countries. You know how Americans love to get Japanese/Chinese characters for tattoos, even if they don’t really know what they mean or how to pronounce them? Then you can blow into the 3DS’ microphone to simulate the Famicom’s microphone! At the end is an appendix that serves as a quick reference if you want to look up where certain things (e.g. shops) are located. You need to press L and R at the same time to bring up a controller select option, then press Y to switch to Controller 2. There are also often technical advantages of using English instead of Japanese – you only need memory for 26 letters if you use English, but well over a hundred if you decide to use Japanese katakana and hiragana. Before we start digging into the game’s main text and such, there are a few interesting things about the game itself that deserve a look! But it's also possible to save without a game over (and thus not affect your death counter). Use the whistle/flute/recorder item! They’re all basically the same, minus some slight text differences. latitude, east-west) are denoted by numbers. I don’t know the technical reason why, it was just something they always said to do with every NES game that had battery saves. A side result of this is that many games released in 1980s Japan used English text. If you feel like you're approaching a difficult challenge ahead, be sure to save just in case. As far as I know, this is the only time the villain’s name is spelled “Gannon” – even the NES manual spells it as “Ganon”. The farthest northern places will be a 1, and the farthest south will be an 8. Then on the second controller, press Up on the D-pad and the A button simultaneously. There’s actually a slight thing with the name of the game that many might not be aware of – the game is called “Legend of Zelda” in Japan but “The Legend of Zelda” in the NES version. But it means that Japanese people can still pick out words they recognize when confronted with a wall of English text. Here’s what it’s like, for those of us who never grew up with a Famicom Disk System: There’s actually a slight thing with the name of the game that many might not be aware of – the game is called “Legend of Zelda” in Japan but “The Legend of Zelda” in the NES version. Who knows, maybe that even helped educate some players! Along the way, I'll be telling you everything you can do in this game--not only every item and Heart Container you can collect, but every secret passage you can open in the overworld, every room in every dungeon in the underworld, every one-time treasure occurrence, etc. But just be aware it's primarily written with the completionist in mind. I have even included a pixelated view of the entire overworld (also in grid-like form) below, credit to NESmaps.com: One final note, about saving and the like. There’s also the fact that it was called a manji in the instruction manual. Basically, the Japanese Famicom system has a lot of little differences when compared with the NES. This added “the” was also included on the NES version’s box, cartridge, manual, and all that too, so at some point someone on the localization team said, “Hey, make extra sure to include ‘The’ in everything!”. bring up your inventory screen). It's definitely important that you save throughout the game. At first it appears the Pols Voices have no weaknesses in these cases, but it turns out their weaknesses were changed yet again: The Japanese 3DS version of the game is kind of nifty. They’re also really tough to beat if you try to use your sword. Which might account for why some other games that came out later seemed to have a file and naming system that looked just like this game’s. It’s interesting that even these old, primitive console games had loading times. This guide is intended to be thorough and comprehensive as I can make it. Furthermore, there is the Second Quest, which for the purposes of this guide I have treated as if it's a separate game altogether (because in many senses it is!). Where the extra “n” comes from is a mystery, but since it was in the Famicom Disk System version first it was most likely someone on the Japanese side who added it in. What a puzzle…. When you turn the power on, the NES version goes immediately to the game’s title screen. if you fell in a dungeon, otherwise you restart from the first screen of the overworld) with three hearts filled. The Intro for the original Legend of Zelda for the Nintendo Entertainment System. As you might expect, this glitch was fixed in the NES version and all versions released afterward. Here’s what the story looks like in the GBA version: Since we’re looking at the Famicom Disk System version of Zelda, it should come as no surprise that the game often has to sit and load new data during parts of the game.

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